'Fair access to care services - guidance on eligibility criteria for adult social care' framework

1 January 2003

The Fair access to care services (FACS) framework was introduced to resolve national inconsistencies in eligibility for support and aimed to provide a fairer system for the allocation of social care services. FACS advocated a single process to assess eligibility for social care support, based on the risks to an individual's independence.

The guidance set out four eligibility bands relating to the risk to an individual's independence and wellbeing:

Critical: when there was a current or future risk to life or the development of significant health problems; serious abuse or neglect had occurred or would occur; an individual was unable to carry out vital personal care; and/or important family roles and responsibilities could not be undertaken.

Substantial: when abuse had or would occur; there was an inability to carry out the majority of personal care or domestic tasks; and the majority of family roles could not be undertaken or sustained.

Moderate: when there was an inability to carry out several personal care and/or domestic tasks and several family roles could not be sustained.

Low: when there was an inability to carry out one or two personal care and domestic tasks and one or two family roles could not be sustained.

FACS practice guidance was published alongside revised policy guidance in 2010. The intention was that the framework and guidance would remain in place until the Care Bill had passed through parliament.

Source(s)

Department of Health
Fair access to care services - guidance on eligibility criteria for adult social care.
Department of Health; 2003.

Social Care Institute for Excellence.
Fair access to care services (FACS): prioritising eligibility for care and support.
Social Care Institute for Excellence; 2013.

Department of Health.
Prioritising need in the context of Putting People First: A whole system approach to eligibility for social care - Guidance on eligibility criteria for adult social care, England 2010.
Department of Health; 2010.